Getting help with writing documents

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When I was a kid, I used to love writing letters. I started, of course, with letters for Santa and then letters to my parents when I was on camp and I even used to write letters to my friends, even though we lived a couple of block away and saw each other in school, because I found it thrilling to write calligraphically and then fold the letter, put it in an envelope, write the address on the envelope and then mail it. Now, nobody writes letters anymore, myself included, instead we write all sorts of content and documents, but not on paper. When I think of all the correspondence that we write these days, from emails and CVs to business documents and recommendations, I can’t stop noticing that not only we use digital platforms all around, but we also make use of the Internet to find writing samples. There are several websites that specialize in offering tips and advice on how to write a job recommendation, official business documents and any other such pieces, a good example being booktips.org, so whatever your task is, you don’t have to waste time and energy on deciding how to phrase the content.

At first, I thought this trend of always looking for samples and never creating a document or a letter on your own, is a sign of sloth, but the more I thought about it I realize that every business environment is now highly active and accelerated, that everyone leads a busy life and has a crazy schedule, which is why we all need to resort to tips and tricks in order to save time and be efficient. And that is exactly what platforms like booktips.org do for us, they help us finish a task or a duty faster, more easily and with less hassle, by providing the tools to efficiency. Furthermore, getting help with writing documents, whatever they may be, whether layoff letters, business quotes or CVs, is not just about saving time, but also finding the right context, as in some cases this matters as much as content. Sometimes, we may find ourselves in the position of having to write a certain proposal or an important business document that we’ve never written before and, instead of taking our best shot at it, we can easily go online and search for information and examples of how to properly phrase and outline the document.

All things considered, even though writing letters may be a lost art, writing documents is still a practice that requires maybe not skills, but attention to details and knowledge of proper forms and contexts. However, plenty of help is available online, on websites like booktips.org, and people can find advice, tips and even samples of all sorts of documents, from business proposals and layoff letters to CVs, job recommendations and character references. It is a highly welcomed help that saves us a lot of time and headache and that also supports a certain continuity and consistency in writing up particular types of documents.